North Carolina Mountain Birds: Swainson’s Thrush

Close up of a medium sized brown bird with speckled chest facing sideways on a branch in the woods

In the spring, we see lots of migratory birds in western North Carolina — some hang around for the spring and summer, while others are just passing through on their way to another destination. One of those “just passing through” birds is our May 2016 pick in our 12 Months of Birding at the Inn blog series: the Swainson’s Thrush.

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North Carolina Mountain Birds: White-throated Sparrow

Stout brownish gray bird with a striped head and boldly colored patch between its eye and bill perched on a tree branch

As we transition from winter to spring, one bird that may be spotted on its migration back north to cooler climes is the White-throated Sparrow, a winter resident of the Asheville area and our March 2016 selection in our 12 Months of Birding at the Inn blog series.

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North Carolina Mountain Birds: Ruby-crowned Kinglet

The February 2016 pick for our 12 Months of Birding at the Inn series on the blog is a cool-weather resident of Pisgah National Forest around the Inn on Mill Creek,  providing a little bit of spunk to the forest during an otherwise quiet wintry season. Let’s meet the Ruby-crowned Kinglet.

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North Carolina Mountain Birds: Red-Winged Blackbird

The Red-winged Blackbird always reminds us of Halloween. Not sure if it’s because it’s a blackbird or because it has a splash or orangey-red on its wings, but at any rate, we’ve chosen the Red-winged Blackbird as our October 2015 bird in our 12 Months of Birding at the Inn series on the blog.

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North Carolina Mountain Birds: Black-throated Green Warbler

Ahhhh, September. The air turns crisper and temperatures start cooling down, but remain perfectly pleasant. It’s a great month to get outside in the mountains of North Carolina! And it’s excellent for bird watching because the changing seasons mean different and interesting birds are migrating through, on their way to their winter destinations.

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